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Purpose/goal

  • To share the EntreComp framework.
  • To share a definition of entrepreneurship as a competence, with the aim to raise consensus among all stakeholders and to establish a bridge between the worlds of education and work.

Duration

Just reading the paper could take aroun 4 hours.

This paper could be worked autonomously or work in teams.

The learner could read it guided by the lecturer or work it using different methosologies.

There is not a fixed time as it depends on the number of questions proposed.

Material

See: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/305991942_Bacigalupo_M_Kampylis_P_Punie_Y_Van_den_Brande_G_2016_EntreComp_The_Entrepreneurship_Competence_Framework_Luxembourg_Publication_Office_of_the_European_Union_EUR_27939_EN

Shortened URL: https://bit.ly/2IkSnkl

Description

Abstract

The development of the entrepreneurial capacity of European citizens and organisations is one of the key policy objectives for the EU and Member States. Ten years ago, the European Commission identified sense of initiative and entrepreneurship as one of the 8 key competences necessary for a knowledge-based society. The EntreComp framework presented in this report proposes a shared definition of entrepreneurship as a competence, with the aim to raise consensus among all stakeholders and to establish a bridge between the worlds of education and work. Developed through a mixed-methods approach, the EntreComp framework is set to become a reference de facto for any initiative aiming to foster entrepreneurial capacity of European citizens. It consists of 3 interrelated and interconnected competence areas: ‘Ideas and opportunities’, ‘Resources’ and ‘Into action’. Each of the areas is made up of 5 competences, which, together, constitute the building blocks of entrepreneurship as a competence. The framework develops the 15 competences along an 8-level progression model and proposes a comprehensive list of 442 learning outcomes. The framework can be used as a basis for the development of curricula and learning activities fostering entrepreneurship as a competence. Also, it can be used for the definition of parameters to assess learners’ and citizens’ entrepreneurial competences.

Language(s)

English

Purpose/goal

  • To reflect on the design thinking methodology and about the use of that approach.
  • To analyze an example of how to redesign a course based on the design thinking approach.
  • To think upon the benefits of teaching and learning entrepreneurship through design thinking

Duration

Just reading the paper could take between 30 min and 1 hour.

This paper could be worked autonomously. The learner could read it and focused on different questions proposed by the lecturer to be answered by them before or after having worked in class the methodology known as design thinking.

There is not a fixed time as it depends on the number of questions proposed.

Material

See: https://innovation-entrepreneurship.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s13731-018-0098-z

Shortened URL: https://bit.ly/2DoRfcL

Description

Abstract

Background: Entrepreneurship has traditionally been taught from a business administration perspective, where predicting the future is central and where the world is seen as linear with known inputs and outputs. The world of entrepreneurs is a quite different, usually highly uncertain environment, and therefore requires a different type of skill set. In this paper, we conceptualize entrepreneurial learning through a method- and design-based approach and illustrate how a course can be developed and designed.

Findings: In this paper it is argued that by utilizing design thinking and a methods approach, learning from a “through” approach can be achieved. This learning is more focused on the entrepreneurial process, highlighting the role of skills and mindset. This learning approach enables student-centered learning and focus on skills more applicable to entrepreneurs. It is also argued that the entrepreneurship process is not linear; therefore, creativity is central and finding structure is an unstructured process. Design thinking emphasizes a practical approach where students step outside the classroom. This experimentation and interaction in the real world of users and customers with real feedback is important in combination with reflection exercises.

Conclusions: This paper highlights how a methods approach and entrepreneurship education with a “through” perspective can be achieved by utilizing design thinking. This is elaborated conceptually and illustrated with an example. We argue that a methods approach for teaching entrepreneurship is beneficial, where design thinking can be one valuable tool and approach for teaching entrepreneurship.

Language(s)

English