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Goal/ Purpose

The Devil’s Advocate method helps learners handle counter-arguments to their own position. This requires them to consciously change their perspective so that new positions can be discovered, critically examined, and tested. The goal of this method is also to motivate learners to engage more deeply with a subject. It can also be used as a warm-up exercise before working on a subject or event, as well as in the evaluation phase of an idea to show its advantages and disadvantages.

Duration

This method can be used as a warm-up activity, in an evaluation phase or during a whole seminar session, 30-90 min, depending on the subject matter.

Material

No specific material needed.

Description

Individual learners or small groups take the role of the so-called ‘devil’s advocate’, an opposing standpoint that is by design expressly critical of the idea or opinion being discussed. A devil’s advocate gathers counter-arguments and attempts to persuade the other participants in the exercise. This exercise promotes an intensive and controversial discussion of ideas. Moreover, by acting out other positions, learners often find it easier to raise topics that they might otherwise be unwilling to talk about. After the exercise, learners discuss how persuasive each argument was.

https://erwachsenenbildung.at/aktuell/nachrichten/7242-advocatus-diaboli-durch-kontroverse-argumentation-ueberzeugen.php

Purpose/goal

Seeing the relationship between language teaching and entrepreneurial education
Teaching language in an entrepreneurial way

Duration

Workshop of 2 hours

Material

Concrete materials such as lego blocks, vegetables and fruit, bathroom products, work utensils and socks

Description

In this workshop students design an entrepreneurial lesson for primary school children.

In order to start this workshop it is important that students already have a basis of didactics and teaching experience.
The workshop starts with a short explanation about entrepreneurship in education. We strongly emphasize the breadth of the subject because entrepreneurship is often only associated with setting up a business, accounting, profit and loss.

Next, students in small groups are given the assignment to work out an entrepreneurial lesson on the basis of concrete material. We give students two materials that at first sight do not seem to have too much to do with each other. The purpose of this is precisely to challenge them to think creatively.

After this first design, we ask them to present their design to another group. The group that listens identifies the business opportunities they have heard and seen in the design. The presenting group complements unnoticed opportunities.

Afterwards, each group gets an additional assignment to look at. They have to look at the language development opportunities in their design. If they are not yet enterprising, they are also asked to make them enterprising. In this way we want students to experience that entrepreneurial teaching is not the same as project teaching. When carrying out a project you indeed have a lot of opportunities to work on the entrepreneurial skills, but also within individual lessons we can make enterprising and in all lessons there is language.